Monthly Archives: September 2014

Religious Faith and Cultural Memory in ‘Deor’

Yesterday, I wrote this post about Deor. I would not have had the idea of talking about the poem in terms of Fate and Providence had I not read the introduction to it first. Upon reflection, that makes the post … Continue reading

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That Passed Away: So May This

Weland, by way of the trammels upon him, knew persecution. Single-minded man, he suffered miseries. He had as his companion sorrow and yearning, wintry-cold suffering; often he met with misfortune once Nithhad had laid constraints upon him, pliant sinew-fetters upon … Continue reading

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The Great Knock of Surrey

C S Lewis Saturday On 26th September 1914, we find a fifteen year old C S Lewis writing a happy letter to his friend Arthur Greeves. Following an unhappy career in England’s private school system, ‘Jack’* had just spent his first week … Continue reading

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Cædmon’s Hymn

Now we must laud the heaven-kingdom’s Keeper, the Ordainer’s might and his mind’s intent, the work of the Father of glory: in that he, the Lord everlasting, appointed of each wondrous thing the beginning; he, holy Creator, at the first … Continue reading

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Happy Anniversary to Éarendel!

It seems odd to be celebrating an anniversary in one’s first post, but this one is not mine. It is for Tolkien’s Middle-earth, which was created a hundred years ago yesterday (24th Sept. 1914) when Tolkien wrote a poem titled The … Continue reading

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